Canada’s education system touches the lives of millions in their roles as students, educators, administrators and parents. A complex set of laws affect the rights, responsibilities and entitlements of these stakeholders, including public, administrative, human rights, constitutional, privacy and municipal law.

Our lawyers have extensive experience acting for governments, public and private school boards, universities and colleges, educators and families on a variety of education matters. Among other things, we act for employers in unionized and non-unionized workplaces, we advise on and litigate Charter and human rights law breaches, we represent educators and students in disciplinary hearings, we assist with all of the commercial aspects of running educational facilities, advise on real estate, land use, construction and infrastructure matters, and advise on tax matters.

We take a multi-disciplinary approach to our education files, engaging our public, constitutional, labour and employment, municipal and commercial lawyers as necessary to ensure our clients receive expert advice that is tailored to their needs.

Meet our lawyers and professionals in this area

Areas of Expertise

  • Constitutional
  • Construction
  • Contracts
  • Disciplinary hearings
  • Employment matters
  • Governance
  • Government policy
  • Human rights
  • Labour relations
  • Municipal law
  • Pensions and benefits
  • Privacy
  • Professional discipline
  • Real Estate
  • School boards
  • School violence
  • Sexual misconduct
  • Special education
  • Student discipline
  • Tax
  • Trustee representation

Representative Experience

  • In Donevan v. University of Windsor, 2013 HRTO 1882, Mr. Anand was appointed pursuant to an HRTO settlement to conduct a review of the University’s policies relating to classroom accommodations for students with disabilities. His review was in part the subject of this decision.
  • In Carasco v. University of Windsor, Mr. Anand was lead counsel in a claim by a law school professor that she was denied the position of Dean because of gender and race discrimination.
  • In Trozzi v. College of Nurses of Ontario, the Divisional Court granted the College’s application for judicial review from a decision of the HRTO in a case involving disability accommodations for a graduate nurse who was seeking admission to the College.
  • Pidgeon v. College of Nurses of Ontario, 2012 HRTO 1712 was a case in which a nursing registrant argued that the revocation of her registration was discriminatory on grounds of disability.
  • Ryan v. College of Nurses of Ontario, 2014 HRTO 139 was a case in which a graduate nurse argued that the College’s refusal to register her was discriminatory on grounds of disability.
  • Hatibovic-Kofman v. Royal College of Dental Surgeons of Ontario, 2010 HRTO 1578 was a case in which the argument was made that the College’s denial of specialty certification was the result of systemic discrimination against foreign trained dentists.

Education - Insight & Events

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